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I have listed a new property at 305 2215 MCGILL ST in Vancouver.
This south facing 2 bedroom, 1 bath, single level suite on the quiet part of McGill is exceptional in design and layout. Small boutique rarely available 3 storey walk up with a courtyard entrance that feels European. On the main floor you have a gas fireplace and a curved deck off of the living area with sweeping views of the harbour, mountains, right to Stanley park. Separate laundry room. The building is self managed, and was totally rain-screened in 2007. Shows very well. 1 parking spot included. All measurements aprox and to be verified by buyer if important. Call LB to schedule a viewing today!
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I have listed a new property at 311 1703 Menzies ST in Merritt.
Investors take note of this 1 bed 1 bath 585 sq ft condo. Previously rented for $788.50 Plus utilities. Top floor unit with elevator in building and shared laundry. Large balcony with built in storage. First time buyer or downsizing? This may be just what you are looking for! Call today to schedule a viewing. 24 hours notice required. All measurements approximate, buyer to verify if deemed important.
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Of all the thousands of homes for sale at any given time… the one thing they all have in common is… the reasons for selling. There are hundreds of them.


Have you ever had a buyer ask you… why are you selling?  Before you answer that question, think carefully.


Since 2008 I’ve been involved in hundreds of home sales and I’ve found they all fall under four basic categories.
These are... Transfer… retire… upgrade… and estate.


Divorce falls under… upgrade…


Depending on which one of these reasons you’re selling for… you may need to reconsider how you’re marketing message comes across.


Never tell the buyer or buyer’s agent it’s because of a divorce. Always tell them it’s because of an upgrade or tell them it’s personal reasons


Divorce sales tell buyers you need to sell quickly and you’ll most likely…attract lower offers… for your home.


Savvy buyers and buyers’ agents know the clues.


You’ll want to eliminate these clues before you allow any showings.

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I have listed a new property at 1046 MATHERS AVE in West Vancouver.
Sentinel Hill! This 3bed,2bath Rancher with basement in West Vancouver has plenty of space, privacy and alley access. No homes in front and located uphill from your neighbours. Features private yard, private entrance with Iron gate stone wall landscaping and Yard has southern exposure perfect for your garden and family gatherings.Updates include Kitchen, flooring, bathrooms, furnace and more. All measurements aprox. Buyer to verify if important. Call LB to schedule a viewing today.
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What is a housing bubble? You’ve undoubtedly heard the term, but what does it actually mean, and is Canada experiencing one? Whether you already own a home, are considering buying one in the near future, or you’re waiting for the right time to sell, here we answer what is a housing bubble, what causes it, and how it may affect you.

What is a Housing Bubble?

A housing bubble happens when the price of homes rises quickly, at an unsustainable rate. Typically, a price-growth rate that’s in the high single-digits is considered to be healthy and sustainable. Under healthy conditions, homeowners continue to earn equity over time, sellers can make a profit on resale, and buyers can still afford to get into the market. This type of price growth can usually be explained by economic factors, such as an employment boom and favourable interest rates.


On the other hand, a housing bubble can happen as a result of non-organic growth. For example, if speculators were flooding the market, buying up homes to take advantage of rapid price growth, with the intention of selling in the near term for a hefty profit. When prices are deemed to have hit a high point, speculators list their properties for sale. This massive influx of listings, coupled with stagnating demand, causes prices to plummet and results in a “housing market crash.”


A housing bubble is a temporary event and prices eventually return to normal levels, when demand rises again and home-buying activity resumes.

What Happens When a Housing Bubble Bursts?

During a housing bubble, homes become overvalued. When the bubble bursts, prices fall. Homeowners who have no intention of selling are unlikely to feel the direct impacts of the bursting bubble. However, these market conditions often indirectly impact other aspects of the economy, so to call homeowners who aren’t selling “free and clear” would be misleading. The ripple effects of a bursting housing bubble would likely touch most of us, in one way or another.

Homebuyers who purchased a home during a housing bubble likely paid considerably more than it is worth. Properties bought by end-users as a residence, with no intention of being sold in the short-term, will eventually rebound closer to “normal” values and at some point, return to positive growth.


A housing bubble poses the biggest risk to home sellers. Those who purchased in the bubble, but now find themselves forced to sell their home, will come up short on resale. They bought the home at a price that exceeds what they can recoup, putting them in the red with no asset to show for it.


For example, someone purchased at peak market prices, but due to circumstances such as a job loss or the inability to carry the costs for any reason, now has no choice but to sell in a down market. The seller still owes money to their mortgage lender on a home that they no longer own.

Are We in a Housing Bubble?

The Canadian housing market took a surprising upward turn during the COVID-19 pandemic, after coming to a grinding halt in mid-March. The slow-down was short-lived, and what followed through the remainder of 2020 was a a spike in demand for homes met by a shortage of supply. With 2021 well underway, there appears to be no end in sight.


There are a number of factors that indicate we’re not experiencing a bubble caused my market speculators, contrary to some media reports.


A recent online survey of RE/MAX brokers and agents in Western Canada, Ontario and Atlantic Canada found that speculators are not a factor in the Canadian real estate market at this time. In fact, more than 96% of RE/MAX brokers and agents supported this finding, confirming that the majority of homebuyers are end-users. Speculators tend to wait out hot markets, buying when prices are down and selling when they’re up again. The short-term investment opportunities they’re generally looking for are hard to find under current market conditions. Bully offers and bidding wars are commonplace, and we continue to see demand outpacing supply with the release of the monthly housing market data. These factors are generally inhospitable to speculators and investors.

For a housing bubble to burst, there needs to be a steep incline in inventory and new listings, and a decline in demand – neither of which is likely to happen any time soon.

Housing Crash 2021? It’s Highly Unlikely.

The Canadian housing market is still feeling the impacts of the pent-up demand from 2017, when the government introduced the foreign buyer tax and the mortgage stress test as a means to cool the overheating market. These policies prompted many homebuyers to move to the sidelines, opting to wait and save, with plans to re-engage in the housing market in a few years.


Now fast-forward a few years to 2020. COVID-19 had a similar impact on the market, whereby many homebuyers delayed their purchase plans due to pandemic-related uncertainties. That pre-existing pent-up demand for homes continued to swell. With Canadians subject to stay-at-home orders with nowhere to go and spend their hard-earned money, they collectively saved historically high sums, which was injected back into the housing market once consumer confidence returned. The spending came in the form of record-high home sales and for those who were unwilling to face the competitive resale market conditions, renovations to existing dwellings. In fact, Canadian real estate was said to be the driving force behind the Canadian economy in 2020.


Savings, low interest rates and low inventory continue to put pressure on the housing market.

Now, consider the housing needs of the 1.2 million people who are expected to immigrate to Canada through 2023, per the government’s 2021-2023 Immigration Levels Plan.


Given all this, it’s highly unlikely that we’ll experience the influx of real estate listings needed for a housing market crash – and if we did see those listings suddenly come on stream, there should be plenty of buyers to absorb them.

Homebuyers and Sellers, Do Your Due Diligence

Challenging market conditions and a still-present global pandemic have added some personal risk on the part of homebuyers and sellers. It’s important to remember that conditions vary across Canada, and can be dramatically different between provinces, cities, and even from one neighbourhood to the next. Now more than ever, it’s important to work with a trusted, experienced professional Realtor who can guide you though the buying and selling process.

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